Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

Some of the symptoms of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can include pain, weakness, numbness, loss of hair on your legs, bluish-colored skin on the feet or calves, poor toenail growth, pain or cramps in your legs when walking, and wounds on your feet and legs that are slow to heal. To properly diagnose this vascular condition, your podiatrist may need to know your Ankle Brachial Index (ABI). Simply put, the ABI compares the blood pressure in the arm with the blood pressure in the ankle. Blood pressure during the heart’s contracting/pumping (systolic) phase is slightly higher in the ankle than it is in the arm for healthy people. Determining the ABI is a very simple and non-invasive procedure, using just a blood pressure cuff and a Doppler instrument. The patient lies down and rests for ten minutes. Then, blood pressure is taken at the upper arm, followed by the ankle. The ankle’s blood pressure is then divided by the arm’s blood pressure. An ABI ratio between 1.0 to 1.4 is considered normal. An ABI ratio of 0.9 or less usually indicates PAD—with moderate cases typically ranging between 0.4 to 0.7, and more severe cases falling below 0.4. If you are experiencing any symptoms of PAD, contact a podiatrist right away for a full examination and to see if your ABI should be analyzed.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Eugene Little, DPM from Foot and Ankle Centers of Ohio. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sidney, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Cracked heels affect up to 20 percent of adults in the United States. Although cracked heels are not usually a major issue, they can become very painful. Common factors that can cause cracked heels include standing for long periods of time, using harsh soaps, walking barefoot, dry skin, and wearing shoes that aren’t supportive. Cracked heels can also be caused by medical issues, such as vitamin deficiencies, fungal infections, obesity, or pregnancy. Common methods to prevent cracked heels include wearing shoes that do support the heel and are not too tight. Tips for relieving cracked heels are to stay hydrated, use a foot cream, and avoid standing for too long in one period. It is suggested that anyone with persistent and painful cracked heels consult with a podiatrist for a proper treatment method.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Eugene Little, DPM from Foot and Ankle Centers of Ohio. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sidney, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Monday, 17 January 2022 00:00

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are wounds that can occur on the feet of people with diabetes. Due to a combination of nerve damage, poor circulation, and immune insufficiency, many people with diabetes are at risk of developing DFUs. These wounds can become infected, leading to complications such as tissue death and amputation. When a patient presents with a non-infected DFU, their doctor may prescribe conservative treatments. Conservative treatments are non-invasive and are used to preserve foot health and function and prevent further complications. Conservative treatments for non-infected DFUs may include taking pressure off of the wound, keeping the area moist to promote healing, and protecting and covering the wound and surrounding skin. These treatments are often effective for non-infected wounds. If you have diabetes, a podiatrist can help you manage the effects of this condition on your feet. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Eugene Little, DPM from Foot and Ankle Centers of Ohio. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sidney, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

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